Demo Roundup vol. 1 (Hex Morbidity, Dragkhar, Disincarnation)

Posted in Reviews on April 12th, 2017 by Matthew Lowery
Demo Roundup Vol 1

There are a handful of excellent demos that I’ve stumbled across or been directed towards recently that I want to bring to your attention as worthy of your time and support. Hex Morbidity hark back to earlier times with evocative, old-school black metal on their self-titled EP. Draghkar spew forth cavernous, morbid death-doom metal, and Disincarnation wield aggressive, surprisingly melodic death metal in the vein of At the Gates. Read on for links and more! Read more »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Martröð – “Transmutation of Wounds”

Posted in Reviews on March 5th, 2017 by Matthew Lowery
Martröð

Martröð is the collaborative project of an international group of musicians united by their shared musical and ideological goals. Featuring Wrest (of Leviathan), D.G. (of Misþyrming), Alex Poole (of Krieg), and others, their pedigree is impressive, but their music ought to stand by itself, and with such an incredible line-up it’s only natural that expectations are high. Thankfully, those expectations have been met, and Martröð really have crafted a very special release with ‘Transformation of Wounds’.

Read more »

Tags: , , , ,

Leviathan – Scar Sighted

Posted in Reviews on March 3rd, 2015 by Matthew Lowery

Leviathan is the one-man black metal project of the controversial California-based multi-instrumentalist, tattooist Jef Whitehead, a.k.a. ‘Wrest’. Wrest made a name for himself with Leviathan’s early music which channelled the depressive suicidal black metal spirit better than almost any of his contemporaries, and 2003’s ‘The Tenth Sub-Level of Suicide’ remains a classic within that subgenre. But as time moved on Wrest began to incorporate many more influences and styles into Leviathan’s music, culminating in 2008’s ‘Massive Conspiracy Against All Life’, to date (in my view) one of the best albums in the entire black metal genre. I remember listening to the album through my earphones on a long, late walk back from town and this album absolutely engulfed me. It grabs you and pulls you in in a deeply unsettling but gripping way with weird, psychedelic melodies and distorted riffs as well as long, progressive song structures.

Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Revocation – Deathless

Posted in Reviews on October 11th, 2014 by Matthew Lowery

Deathless is the fifth full-length album from the Boston-based metal band Revocation, recently signed to Metal Blade Records. Revocation play an interesting blend of technical death metal and thrash metal not entirely unlike bands such as the British band Sylosis. While in the past Revocation have placed a lot of emphasis on technicality and a kind of controlled chaos, Deathless sees the band shift emphasis towards a much darker, heavier, and more focused sound.

Deathless is by far the heaviest and darkest album that Revocation have released to date. There’s a far greater emphasis on atmosphere here, with guitarists Dave and Dan taking their undoubted technical skill and applying it in a more focused way.  The down-tuned guitars shed unnecessary technicality in favour of creating a more cohesive sound with songs that flow more naturally with a more clearly defined sense of where they’re going. To be clear, the riffs are still incredibly technical, it just feels like they did a better job of writing ones that work together better. And the guitar solos are better than ever before, which is saying a lot considering how phenomenal Dave’s solos have been in the past. And the production is better than ever before. On previous albums the production has led to a slightly sterile sound, which isn’t great when you’re playing super-technical death metal. Here the music is allowed room to breathe more naturally, enhancing all aspects of their sound here.

Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Fallujah – The Flesh Prevails

Posted in Reviews on July 25th, 2014 by Matthew Lowery

Very few metal albums have been hyped as much as Fallujah’s second full length album ‘The Flesh Prevails’ has. Though their first album put them on the map as one of better deathcore bands, blending technical death metal and progressive metal elements together, it was their Nomadic EP in 2013 that really made this a band to watch out for: ambient, heavy, and progressive all at once, the EP significantly raised people’s expectations for his band, though its short tracklist left us wanting more. So the question is: Does The Flesh Prevails live up to that hype?

In one word: yes. It absolutely does. On The Flesh Prevails, Fallujah take that deeply atmospheric and progressive death metal sound they began to really explore on Nomadic and really make it their own. There’s an even greater sense of atmosphere, but where Nomadic was dark and murky, The Flesh Prevails is ethereal and even upbeat. Of course, this is ultimately death metal so when I say upbeat take it in that context! There’s a great sense of contrast created between the ambiance and atmosphere created by the guitars and other instruments and the vocals; low, guttural, death metal roars keep The Flesh Prevails from floating away completely and keep it grounded.

Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rivers of Nihil – The Conscious Seed of Light

Posted in Reviews on May 23rd, 2014 by Matthew Lowery

Rivers of Nihil’s debut album ‘The Conscious Seed of Light’ was actually released on Metal Blade back in October 2013. That means I’m pretty late with reviewing this album, but this album has impressed me so much that I feel I need to share it with you. If The Faceless and Fit for an Autopsy had a baby, this band would be it. Rivers of Nihil take a technical approach to death metal that is thoroughly brutal while also trying their hand at a bit of melody and ambiance, largely created by the two guitarists, as well as a nice sprinkling of black metal. I’ll be brief so you can just go and listen to the album straight away.

The twin guitars are at times pummeling, in the opening track ‘Rain Eater’ acting as an auditory jackhammer, drilling away at your eardrums with absolute ferocity, while at others such as on ‘Mechanical Trees’ where they play with the contrast between a down-tuned background chugging and ambient post-rock moments. The riffs come thick and fast, with the only problem being that there are so many riffs that I’m not sure which one I like the most! The drums compliment the guitars as an equally varied instrument, moving with ease between mid-tempo rhythms, to blastbeats, and other complicated, fast-paced arrangements. The vocals have a slightly deathcore edge to them but remain varied, with deep gutturals and powerful mids, while on some parts of ‘Place of Serpents’ they’re more hardcore. The vocals may be the only point on which Rivers of Nihil may divide opinion, as they’re not your usual death metal gutturals.

Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Falls of Rauros & Panopticon – Split 12″

Posted in Uncategorized on May 11th, 2014 by Matthew Lowery
image

Both Falls of Rauros and Panopticon are United States black metal-ish
bands who have collaborated for this powerful 12" split release.
Panopticon (actually a solo project) is openly anarchistic in the real
sense of the term, opposing both the state and capitalism. While I’m not
quite so certain about Falls of Rauros, looking at the lyrics they seem to share a common distaste/bitterness for modern consumerist,
capitalist society and they both seem to express a preference for the
natural world over an ultimately coercive and destructive human one.
These political and environmental views certainly seems to fuel the
sound of the music they create. The two artists apparently spent some
time together in Norway, and such an environment that has inspired so
many Norwegian black metal bands like Burzum and Gorgoroth to create
such dark, atmospheric, and compelling music, has clearly had an effect
on them.

Falls of Rauros’ side:

  1. ‘Unavailing’ (11:53)
  2. The Purity of Isolation’ (06:45)

This is actually the first new material from Falls of Rauros since their
last full-length album in 2011, so in a sense there’s some pressure on
them to not let people down, and they certainly don’t. ‘Unavailing’ is a
wonderful exposition in atmospheric black metal, featuring numerous
beautiful, sorrowful guitar melodies soaring amongst the tasteful and
measured drumming, and a deep, earthy bass contribution to help ground
the guitars and keep them from sounding too airy. About 2 minutes
in there’s an astonishing but short guitar solo which is picked up
again later in the track which really does provoke an emotional reaction
to the music.

The second track ‘The Purity of Isolation’ begins as a
pretty big departure from the previous track, instead focusing on an
acoustic guitar and soft, chanted vocals, before introducing a few more
electrified melodies and black metal screams instead of singing, but
never leaving the folky acoustic base of the song. There is something so
utterly compelling about the mournfulness that permeates every moment
of both these tracks that one cannot help but be moved by it. One senses
at the same time a deep love for the natural world and life itself, but
also despair at the tragedy that has befallen nature at our hands.

“I can not find any beauty
in our sightless ambitions
I am through with forgiveness
for our unseeing
I will not feel any sorrow
by the crumbling of towers
raised from the earth in arrogance
Cleaving the welkin
Piercing the heavens”
Falls of Rauros – Unavailing

Even before I read the lyrics this was something I had a real sense of,
drawing from what little knowledge of the political backgrounds of these
two artists that I had, from the album cover, the track titles, and the
kinds of feelings they were eliciting from me, but if you do read the
lyrics (you can do so here)
I would argue their sound and their message work in tandem,
complementing each other and expressing more viscerally the concepts
they wanted to communicate. At times reminding me of Alcest’s second
album ‘Écailles de lune’ FoR’s side of the split impressed me greatly
and as soon as I publish this review I’m off to go have a listen to more
of their music.

Panopticon’s side

  1. ‘Through Mountains I Wander This Evening’ (4:33)
  2. ‘Can You Loan Me a Raven?’ (7:29)
  3. ‘Gods of Flame’ (4:26)
  4. ‘One Cold Night’ (7:56)

Panopticon’s side of the split is a much more straightforward affair
though on a similar level of quality. Sole band member A. Lunn was
clearly a lot more influneced by traditional Norwegian black metal than
his FoR counterparts. Opening track ‘Through Mountains I Wander This
Evening’  has a pretty traditional verse-chorus song structure and I really enjoy the ‘chorus’ part of this song. The band take a moment away from
the blastbeats and noise to focus on an Agalloch-ian tremolo-picked
guitar chord and settle into a more rhythmic drum pattern before leaping
straight back into the fray. ‘Can You Loan Me a Raven?’ is a much more
experimental piece of music. Though still remaining strictly within the
boundaries of black metal, it seems to explore the effects that an
almost hypnotic sense of repetition can achieve, in a very Svartidaudi/Wormlust-ian way, with a slow, droning pace, audible and
enjoyable bass, massive sections of noise, static and guitar feedback
before the drums kick back in and these wonderfully dark guitar notes
are introduced that are ingenious in their simplicity and the sort of
dark atmosphere they help further intensify.

Gods of Flame is more closely aligned with the opening track opting for a
more straightforward Norwegian black metal sound with all the
essentials you might expect with layers of atmosphere and a great raw
sound, as well as a really evil passage just before 3 minutes in. The
final track ‘One Cold Night’ is the one that made the greatest
impression on me, however. The song starts slow and the opening guitar
riff is utterly dark and entrancing, probably my favourite on the entire
split. The introduction of the muffled black metal snarls muffled in
the distance with the introduction of quiet but reverb-heavy guitars
layered on top of the whole thing heavily reminds me of the sort
of thing Burzum might have written for, say, Dunkelheit. Moments of
frenzy with blastbeats and hectic riffs, complimented by identical bass,
break up the slow pace of much of the song before slowly returning to
the depths, only to be summoned forth once more to tear off what is left
of your face by the end of this split.

This is definitely among the best splits I have had the pleasure of
listening to. Falls of Rauros present a compelling and emotionally
resonant atmospheric and melancholic take on black metal while
Panopticon opt for an equally atmospheric take but with greater emphasis
on rawness and influence from such Norwegian greats as Gorgoroth and
Burzum. The album artwork (high-res version here)
is also fantastic in my opinion, perfectly epitomising the kind of
scenery brought to mind by these two talented bands. Highly recommended
if you’re at all a fan of black metal.

Falls of Rauros & Panopticon – Split 12" is available May 3, 2014 through Bandcamp (FoR, Panopticon) or on vinyl through Bindrune Recordings

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,